The Cellular Culture

America is quickly becoming what I call a Cellular Culture.

 
Many people no longer own computers or printers. Scanners? Ha! No.
 
Instead, the Cellular Culture uses their cell phones for almost everything. That’s particularly the case with the sub-30 year old segment of our population. Some don’t even use email.
 
Their major means of communication is through . . . wait for it . . . social media.
 
If a Cellular Culture person wants to complain about a customer service issue, she uses Facebook, Twitter, and even Yelp. I’ve seen people pick up their phones in a restaurant to write a scathing review online rather than speak with a manager.
 
Less chance of having someone spit in their food, maybe?
 
Ringing doorbells is apparently now considered intrusive to some people. I have a neighbor whose friends don’t get out of their cars to announce their arrivals. They used to blow their horns, but now, I more often see them sitting quietly in their cars and texting until someone comes outside,
 
Yet even texting is considered old school by some younger people.
 
The Cellular Culture is different than any we’ve seen before, and it’s evolving far more rapidly than we know.
 
I practice personal injury law across Florida, and that means I will represent clients from from the Keys to the Panhandle. I do not meet in person with all my clients. There’s little need for it today because I use a Cloud-based software platform that allows my clients to see every document I send or receive in their cases, and my clients can use Face-time or Skype if they really want to see my smiling face.
 
Plus, I communicate with my clients every month or so via phone calls, texts, and email. I want to know what’s going on with them. I want them to know they can reach out to me through a variety of ways whenever they want. I respond whenever I can.
 
So far, so good, right?
 
The proverbial fly in the ointment, though, arises when my clients must send me legal documents. The Cellular Culture tends to send pictures of documents. Those pictures are often illegible and incomplete. I’ve received pictures of a contract’s signature block before.
 
That obviously won’t do.
 
Discovery in a lawsuit can be a nightmare. Think of someone sending you a picture of each Interrogatory answer. If you’re lucky enough to get PDFs, well, you’ll potentially receive a separate PDF for each page—that literally can mean dozens of PDF pages that could and should be sent as a single document.
 
I’ve spent many hours creating a single document from a jumbled mess of discordant PDFs. Such messes sometimes arrive a few hours before the discovery deadline.
 
It’s frustrating.
 
Yet I don’t blame my clients. It’s an educational process for them. I now discuss their legal needs—not mine, theirs—in the beginning stages of my representation of them.
 
No pictures. Opposing counsel and the E-Filing Portal won’t accept them.
 
If I send them a document to complete, then I need them to return a whole document. Not the signature page and certainly not just a picture of the client’s signature.
 
Don’t send legal materials and confidential through Facebook.
 
Don’t text discovery materials to me.
 
I also send SASEs to my clients now because I had one client who was unfamiliar with how to buy stamps. Some people do not use a service if it’s not online. Some seemingly have never mailed anything.
 
So how else do I handle this new communication challenge?
 
I now recommend my Cellular Culture clients download free PDF apps like Adobe Fill & Sign. I ask them to try a few until they find one they like. PDF technology has become increasingly more intuitive over the last few years.
 
I actually get the Cellular Culture despite some of the challenges it represents. I hate paper. I rarely print anything. Why should I? We lawyers rarely file paper motions anymore unless a judge requires it.
 
I use my iPad for referring to motions and pleadings when I’m in state court. My trial exhibits, unless I’m entering them into evidence, are encompassed in PowerPoint presentations.
 
I literally do not keep paper files or even CD-ROMs. I turn everything into a digital file and use a multiplicity of Cloud and backup hard drives in order to ensure nothing gets lost.
 
It’s a rare occasion when I can’t tell a client exactly what’s going on with her case. I’ve even done it from the Bahamas. Yes, I answer emails, texts, and phone calls while on vacation. I doubt you’re surprised. If you are, well, you’re probably new here.
 
Yet I wonder what the future holds for communication.
 
One day, and it’s coming very soon, we may be dealing with embedded communication technology that doesn’t require external devices. Indeed, that’s the premise of the Synchronicity. Google the term. You’ll probably be fascinated by the concept.
 
We will all be the Borg. Resistance is futile.
 
Until the Synchronicity arrives, though, we have the new Apple Watch. It no longer requires a cellular phone to be present to use it, and I suspect some of the Cellular Culture will no longer use their cell phones very often.
 
Eventually, we may have a strictly Watch Culture. I’ve no idea how I’m going to handle that technological evolution.
 
I’m sure there’s going to be an app for that.

Don’t Discuss Your Case On Social Media

Please do not post anything about your legal matters on social media. I guarantee you that opposing counsel will try to use it against you. That’s defense counsel’s job.
 
You can’t blame opposing counsel when you make her job easier.
 
I’ve had personal clients post pictures and videos of themselves climbing mountains, skydiving, running in marathons, lifting heavy weights at gyms, easily swinging children around like rag-dolls, clearing voluminous amounts of debris from their yards, and many other such things that defendants will use against them during litigation.
 
Can I explain away those things to a jury? Maybe. But why complicate your case? Why shoot yourself in your foot before you even step into the courtroom?
 
You might as well grab a big stack of cash and burn it.
I saw a video last night in which someone got rear-ended. The first words the driver spoke were less than kind and cultured. Okay, that stream of profanities is understandable, but a jury is not going to like it. But what’s worse is the fact that the driver and passenger then reassured each other that neither was injured.
 
Guess what opposing counsel will play to the jury? It will probably become her closing argument’s soundtrack. The jury will likely hear it several times.
 
You see, the fact is facts don’t always matter. The defendant gets to play defense, and if he can make you out to be a greedy liar, well, he’s probably within his rights to try it. Many jurors don’t like personal injury victims.
 
Don’t cripple your own case.
 
Here are a few things I’ve also seen hurt cases:
 
1. Posting “I had a great day!” Really? But you testified under oath in your deposition that you’re miserable every day . . .
 
2. Posting about your hobbies. You know, the hobbies you can no longer do? Those hobbies.
 
3. Posting derogatory comments about the person who hit you. Calling the woman who hurt you a “cunt” or a guy a “dickhead” is not going to play well with a jury. It’s a negligence lawsuit and not a deliberate act.
 
4. Bragging about what you you’re going to do with your lawsuit winnings. Well, they might not be as big as you think now, because opposing counsel will try to make your case into the next “hot coffee” example for tort reform.
 
5. Posting pictures of you hugging your car and weeping over its damage. “So, Mr. Plaintiff, you were more concerned with your car than with your alleged injuries at the scene, weren’t you?” Yeah. Seen that before too.
 
Here is my “free advice” on legal issues and social media: Nothing you post will help your case. Many jurors don’t get vacations, won’t appreciate your wedding pictures, will despise you for looking happy when you’re supposed to be miserable, and so on.
 
Don’t give the other side anything they can use against you. Claims adjusters and defense counsel can, do, and will comb through your posts to see what’s there.
 
Set your privacy settings as high as possible to minimize that possibility.
 
I’ve literally had to tell clients they’ve destroyed their cases through social media posts. No personal attorney wants to get a phone call from a claims adjuster or opposing counsel that says, “Tell your client we are reducing our settlement offer . . . Oh, and please tell her to save her social media post from XX-XX-XXXX. I’m sending you a spoliation letter/Request for Production today. Will you be dropping her?”
 
Social media bad.
Silence good.
Zip your lips and still your fingers!